Beware: 'Kidnap for organs' syndicate, organ theft 'modus'

A Facebook post warning Filipinos to be aware of an alleged "kidnap for organs" syndicate and their organ theft "modus" has gone viral online.


The shocking cautionary advisory was posted Saturday, March 7, on a community page called 'Ask a Fil-Am Doctor 4 free'. It already got more than 4,900 likes and 52,000 shares as of 11:30 p.m. Monday, March 9.

The first two paragraphs of the warning read:

PHILIPPINES KIDNAPING SYNDICATES STRIKING AGAIN FOR YOUR ORGANS TO BE SOLD AS MUCH AS P500,000. BEWARE AND ALERT YOUR LOVED ONES. AFTER READING THE WHOLE ARTICLE, PLEASE DON`T FORGET TO TAG YOUR CHILDREN AND LOVED ONES.

Organs that can be transplanted are the heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, pancreas, intestine, and thymus. Tissues include bones, tendons (both referred to as musculoskeletal grafts), cornea, skin, heart valves, nerves and veins."

Screencap from Facebook (click it to enlarge)

According to the post, members of the "kidnap for organs" syndicate roam around Metro Manila and in provinces with the intention to abduct women and children and to harvest internal organs which will be sold abroad for P100,000 up to half a million pesos. Due to the scarcity of organ donors, it was revealed that "illegal organ traders" resorted to kidnapping to earn money.

Apparently, the methods of operation are as follows:

Modus Style No. 1
  • The syndicate will pretend that they are conducting a survey for a new scented product. Once smelled, you will get dizzy and lose consciousness.
Modus Style No. 2
  • The group will act as if they are lost. They will ask for directions and tell you to go with them and guide them to their destination. If you refuse, someone will push you and another will grab and force you to get inside the van.
The page admin urged followers to share the post to help fight the crime as well as gave an advise to report at the nearest police station or call 117 immediately if one gets to encounter or witness the said modus.

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This was not independently verified. As far as we know, Philippine authorities have not issued a similar warning.